Hotels

Review: Bellagio Suite, Las Vegas

During our most recent visit to Las Vegas, we stayed at a number of hotels. This included two separate one night stays at the Bellagio. The more time I spent at the Bellagio the more I realised I couldn’t possibly review this 500,000 square foot resort in one post.

Instead, I’ve decided to focus on the rooms specifically. On our first visit to the Bellagio, we spent one night in a two queen bed hotel room in the main Bellagio tower. However, in this review, I’ll be looking at our upgraded stay to the Bellagio Suite.

How We Upgraded To The Bellagio Suite

We booked this room using a MyVegas comp room, from the awards section. This entitled us to a standard queen room, like the one we reviewed here.

However, for the purposes of this review and to document and create as much as we could from our trip to Vegas, I was intrigued to find what sort of upgrade I might be able to get us and at what cost.

We arrived at the check-in desk at around 2pm, there was a rather long queue and we waited for around 30 minutes, despite the fact check-in doesn’t officially open until 3pm. See how we managed to get our queen room at 11am in our other review.

Upon arriving at the check-in desk, I handed over the passports and allowed the staff member to find the booking etc. Then, I asked if there was any upgrade availability.

I was offered an upgrade to a Salon Suite with a strip view for an additional $65. This didn’t include resort fees which currently stand at $45 a night. Unfortunately, however, upon checking with her assistant it seemed that the only available for this Suite was on a smoking floor, and would be a smoking room.

Filled with some sort of cold or flu, taking a smoking room wasn’t an option.

Which is when I was offered the Bellagio Suite.

The suite was offered at $135 without resort fees, and I was informed that no current suite was ready for us to check in straight away. Now at this point, I’ve paid nothing for our room thanks to the MyVegas application, so to get an upgrade to a Suite that often retails at around $500 a night before resort fees for just $135 is pretty impressive.

However, this was slightly out of our budget.

Helen was worried and nervous and so we decided to go back to our original booking. Which is when the staff member went over to her manager and asked for an additional discount on the Bellagio suite.

I’d not read anything in any forums about this, so it was pretty unexpected however, it did bring the bill down to just $100 instead of the $135 I was previously quoted. Again, this didn’t include resort fees but it was an 80% discount (based on how much we’d paid for our room so far) on the RRP of the Suite in question.

So, we took it. I did enquire multiple times about possible food credit – we were starving so room service would have been ideal, however, this wasn’t an option that the Bellagio seemed to offer unlike some of the other resorts when being upgraded on the Las Vegas strip.

A couple of things to note about this upgrade;

  • I didn’t use the $20 or $50 passport sandwich trick.
  • This wasn’t over the weekend, where capacity is higher and therefore I assume upgrades will cost more and be harder to achieve.
  • Had I had a little more confidence, I reckon I could have possibly got the suite for maybe $80 a night.
  • We only had one night booked. I imagine the more nights you have booked the harder the long term availability gets and therefore the harder it is to negotiate any kind of discount.

Around half an hour after leaving the check-in desk we had the text to say our Suite was ready. Excited, we left the pool area and headed for the spa tower where our Suite was located.

Looking at the Bellagio from the fountains it’s a separate building to the right of the hotel which was constructed in 2004 (while the main Bellagio building was constructed in 1998)

Living Room

There’s a large corridor style entrance hallway as you enter the room, with a guest bathroom off to the right (more details on the bathrooms below) straight ahead you’ll notice the incredible full scale panoramic windows that provide an incredible view out onto the strip with a view of the fountains off to the left.

Walk forward and to the right, in the corner between the hallway and the entrance to the bedroom you’ll find a large desk space. This is ideal for working, informal meetings etc. Sadly, with us only spending one night here we didn’t have a chance to work here, although with the lovely leather chairs and the incredible view I can imagine there’s worse places in the world to reply to emails.

Notice the adjoining door to the back of the sofa on the photo below that connects two of the Bellagio suites together if required. In this case, it wasn’t needed and was locked off.

The very spacious living room area is ideal for entertaining guests. My mum came over to look at our Suite and stayed to watch TV for a while. This area can comfortably seat five people in total, with the large (albeit extortionate) mini bar under the TV.

Much like the queen room at the Bellagio, you can see some unintentional age in the fixtures and fittings when looking across at the TV. The cabinets where the minibar is situated could be both more modern while also inkeeping with the room. The same goes for the TV which is a relatively old model.

Bedroom

Onto the bedroom, now the Bellagio Suite only comes with a king bed. However, an additional rollaway bed is available should it be required.

The bed is incredible, large, well decorated and incredibly comfortable. It has the small buffeted seating area at the bottom of the bed, again something we saw in the queen room. However, there’s also a very well situated chez lounge that allows you to sit or lay, relax and watch the fountains, again out of those incredible full-scale windows.

Another seat off to the corner where the TV is situated, alongside some lovely decorations. The side table in particular I thought was brilliant – it’s something I’d purchase for our home.

Again, the things that showed the most ageing in this room tended to be the TV cabinets and the TV itself. Alongside the buttons that once again operated the curtains as we saw in the queen room.

Bathrooms

Firstly, we have a guest bathroom. This bathroom is made up of a toilet and a sink area, which is situated next to the entrance of the room.

Again, throughout all the bathrooms in this suite you can see some unintentional ageing to the fixtures and fittings within the bathroom.

If you’ve watched our video review on Youtube of this suite you’ll notice that the bath which is situated in ‘her bathroom’ is huge, and could comfortably fit two.

‘His bathroom’ which features a shower with a steam option also comes with an incredible range of vanity products not all of which are included in the standard queen rooms.

Again, the shower is incredibly large with a seating option designed for the steam room features should this be required. I didn’t test it out, I’m not sure how to use it and had some Final Destination fears of doing it on my own without supervision!

‘His bathroom’ also includes a TV integrated into the mirror. No doubt designed for the male to catch up on the latest news and sport while brushing his teeth or shaving ready for the day. For me personally, it was simply a novelty that I’d never really, get the chance to utilise.

Is It Worth Upgrading To The Bellagio Suite?

Personally, I found the $100 upgrade from the two-bedroom queen room we’ve previously reviewed to this Bellagio Suite to be very worthwhile. The major features being additional space and additional bathrooms make this ideal if you’re looking to get a rollaway bed in the room or use the room for a family.

Aside from this, if like us you’re wanting one night of blow out luxury, then upgrading to the Bellagio Suite seems to be an affordable way of doing so.

As always though, we’d love to know what you think in the comments below.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *